How do I find a death article?

How do I find a death article?

Two state-level California Death Indexes can be found at Ancestry.com (a database anyone can access from any library branch and Central Library) or FamilySearch.org (a free internet database). California, Death Index, 1905-1939 provides the digitized index page, plus its transcription.

What is the best source for obituaries?

To search thoroughly for obituaries from past newspaper editions, the best approach is to use a variety of tools including Ancestry’s Obituary Collection, Ancestry’s Historical Newspapers collection, Newspapers.com and offline research through local libraries and newspaper offices.

How do I find local obituaries?

Newspapers. If you know the newspaper, or at least the town where a person lived and died, then a newspaper website can be a good place to begin. Many newspapers have digitized their archives, making it easier to locate older obituaries as well as recently published obituaries.

How do I find an obituary in The New York Times?

Search Legacy.com for all paid death notices from The New York Times. Announcements of deaths may be telephoned from within New York City to (212) 556-3900; outside the city to toll-free 1-800-458-5522; sent by email to [email protected]

Are all deaths published in newspapers?

Short answer. It is not a legal requirement to publish an obituary in a newspaper in order to announce a death. However, a death certificate must be filed with the state’s office of vital statistics when someone dies.

What should you not write in an obituary?

What You Don’t Have to Include in an Obituary

  • Exact birth date. More people are choosing to leave out the deceased’s exact birth date when writing an obituary.
  • Mother’s maiden name.
  • Address.
  • Education.
  • Ex-spouses.
  • Children.
  • Jobs or careers.
  • Cause of death.

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